Blog tour review: Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey (and a nifty giveaway!)

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Ginger Monette

On January 31st I reviewed Darcy’s Hope: Beauty from Ashes — the first book in Ginger Monette’s two-part Darcy’s Hope saga. Find the review here.

Today’s review is for the second volume, Darcy’s Hope at Donwell Abbey.

Blurbing the book:

1917. On the Western Front of WW1, Captain Fitzwilliam Darcy has won the heart of Elizabeth Bennet. Finally.

Then she disappears.

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Purchase here

Still reeling from the loss, Darcy is struck by a battlefield tragedy that plunges him into a dark and silent world.

Sent to Donwell Abbey to recover, he’s coaxed back to life by an extraordinary nurse determined to teach him how to live and love again. A woman whose uncanny similarities to Elizabeth invite his admiration and entice his affections.

His heart tells him to hold on to Elizabeth.

His head tells him to take a chance with his nurse.

But Donwell Abbey holds a secret that could change everything….

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And my review:

It is a truth universally acknowledged amongst JAFF readers that no matter in what situations Darcy and Elizabeth find themselves, their course of true love never runs smoothly. And so it is here …

silver-music-box2Through a series of misunderstandings that seem to point to Elizabeth’s being involved in a spy ring, and possibly being a target for murder, Darcy and Elizabeth are separated once again when she runs off to protect not only herself but Darcy and his family. Unable to locate her, Darcy accepts a dangerous wartime mission that results in his suffering grievous injuries. His recovery is lengthy and frustrating. Altho’ his nurse takes prodigious care of him and his aunt attempts to match him with her daughter, Darcy heartbreakingly continues to long for Elizabeth. The only tangible memento he has of her is a silver music box that plays their song — Let me call you Sweetheart — and which he keeps with him at all times.

 

A Great-War era version of this popular song.

Ultimately we get our longed-for happily-ever-after in a most delightful way.

What I liked most: The realism of “the war to end all wars” and its effects on our beloved characters. The true-to-Jane-Austen credibility of her characters within this non-canon setting. Skillful interweaving of characters and locations from other of Jane Austen’s stories and from popular non-Austen stories as well, along with satisfying and befitting new characters. Darcy’s heroism in the face of near-certain catastrophe. Plenty of face time for Colonel Fitzwilliam. And of course the delightful and heartwarming ending.

What I liked least: INMSHO, the blurb and the book cover together telegraph a bit too much of the story so the reader more or less knows what to expect. Even so, it was very enjoyable to see how it played out. Also, there were moments of reading when I could not quite suspend disbelief; I’m not going to specify as that would require spoilers, but I am convinced that you will recognize the moments as you read the story. I hope you will do as I did: even with suspended disbelief, continue with the story. It is worth it.

In short: I could hardly put this book down. (I lost a lot of sleep during the reading!) Altho’ the two books are available — and to some extent marketed — as stand-alone stories, for maximum enjoyment I recommend you read the first story before starting on this second. Fortunately, Beauty from Ashes (part one of the saga) is currently being offered at a discounted kindle price to get you started on the road to Darcy’s Hope.

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The Giveaway!

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Each tin of Downton Abbey tea comprises 36 teabags of this collector’s edition and limited-quantity tea. The plum pudding flavour contains: Fine black tea, natural vanilla flavor, cinnamon, natural flavor, natural plum flavor, sloeberries, and elderberries.

To enter the giveaway (sorry, USA residents only):

As my webhost does not seem to work with Rafflecopter, I’m not even going to bother posting the Rafflecopter giveaway link. Instead, I recommend that you visit Babblings of a Bookworm (or any of the other blogs in the blog tour; see list below) to access the Rafflecopter giveaway. And good luck!

If you would like to gain additional entries, just share this post on your Facebook page and/or leave a comment on this blog. (Click Leave a comment above the upper left-hand corner of this post beneath the blog title.)

And do follow the rest of the blog tour for excerpts, interviews, and additional reviews:

Feb 1 The Ardent Reader
Feb 2 From Pemberley to Milton
Feb 3 My Jane Austen Book Club
Feb 4 My Love for Jane Austen
Feb 5 vvb32reads
Feb 6 Just Jane 1813
Feb 7 Savvy Verse & Wit
Feb 8 Austenesque Reviews
Feb 9 My Kids Led Me Back to Pride & Prejudice
Feb 10 Babblings of a Bookworm
Feb 11 Obsessed with Mr. Darcy
Feb 12 Musings from the Yellow Kitchen
Feb 13 Half Agony, Half Hope
Feb 14 My Vices and Weaknesses
Feb 15 Diary of an Eccentric

Feb 16 Every Savage Can Dance

Feb 17 More Agreeably Engaged

Feb 18 The Calico Critic

Feb 20 Austenesque Reviews

Feb 21 More than Thornton

Feb 22 Margie’s Must Reads

Feb 23 Delighted Reader

Feb 24 Becky’s Book Reviews

Feb 26 Linda Andrews

Feb 27 Every Woman Dreams

Feb 28 Tomorrow is Another Day

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And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy heredesp-hearts-cover

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I must have my …

Some friends and I watched the wonderful Lost in Austen the other day, and the post-viewing conversation naturally meandered to the many things we have or use in 2016 that would not even exist two hundred years ago. What would it be like to be transported to the past — specifically to Jane Austen’s time — and what would we miss most.

We decided to make a list of the things we would want to take with us if we could ever be transported back to the world of Pride and Prejudice and Mr Darcy.

Sure, there are lots of things that the Regency world could never have dreamed of, so we decided to limit our choices to things that we could actually use there. Cell phones, movie theatres, and anything that relied on electricity or gasoline/petrol of course was out.

Each of us chose three items. Here’s the final list we came up with.

dotted_panties_-_pink~ Toothbrush and toothpaste
~ Shampoo
~ Underpants
~ Mascara
~ Blusher
lip-gloss.jpg~ Lipstick/lip gloss
~ Contact lenses
~ Oreo cookies (altho’ the case could be made that we could recreate these)
~ My dog
~ The book Fifty Shades of Grey
running-shoes~ Teabags (can you believe someone actually picked this? LOL!)
~ Running shoes

Are these the same things you would choose? If not, please leave your list of three items in a Comment — see link to Leave a Comment above left. We might even scare up a prize for the best list!

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Tea and cakes

teacupA popular theme in Austen, Austenesque, and meetings of Janeites is tea, usually served with bread and butter or cakes, or both. In the time period, cakes usually referred to what we call soft cookies. (The word cookie did not enter the lexicon until some decades later.)

Recall that ovens were outdoor affairs, and had no temperature controls. The baker had to essentially wing it as far as baking temperatures, altho’ experienced bakers could fairly well control the proper heat and baking time.

When we still lived up North we often visited Colonial Williamsburg, ate at the restaurants, and picked up some cookbooks while we were there. This is my favourite recipe — very easy and very tasty, and very versatile: you can ice them, serve with jam or cream similar to scones, mix in chopped nuts, currants, or even chocolate mini chips. Or make a pyramid for a lovely presentation. Enjoy with your favourite cuppa, perhaps a Jane Austen-inspired tea.

18th Century recipe

Take a pound and a half of fine flour, one pound of cold butter, half a pound of sugar, work all these well together into a paste, then roll it with the palms of your hands into round balls, and cut them with a thin knife into thin cakes, sprinkle a little flour on a sheet of paper, and put them on; prick them with a fork and bake them.

21st Century version

  • 4 1/2 cups flour
  • 2 cups butter
  • 1 cup sugar
  1. Cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Add flour in thirds to the mixture. Remove the mixture by scraping with a spatula or knife and place on hard surface and knead until well mixed and smooth. Dough will be stiff.
  2. Form into four balls, one the size of a tennis ball and reducing in size as you go until the smallest ball is about 1 ½ inches in diameter.
  3. Slice dough 1/4” thick with a sharp, smooth knife. Place on parchment paper or lightly greased cookie sheets.
  4. Bake at 350, 12-18 minutes until the centers of the large cakes are set when lightly pressed with your finger.
  5. After cooling, remove from cookie sheet. To form into a pyramid shape, use the larger cakes on the base, and stack the next smaller ones on top. Sift confectioner’s sugar on top (optional).

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