You too can be a book reviewer

It’s said that love makes the world go ’round. I have, however, observed that it’s reviews that make the book world go around.

When you shop online for a book, do you check out how many stars the book has received from reviewers? Do you browse the reviews? If you have to choose between two books, do the stars and the review text influence your decision?

You’re not alone; most people look at reviews on amazon, GoodReads, Facebook, blogs, and anywhere else they’re posted — and these reviews influence buying decisions. So it really means the world to authors when their work receives reader reviews.

If you enjoyed a particular book, the nicest thing you can do to let the author know that his/her work pleased you is to write an online review. You don’t need a blog, and you needn’t write a voluminous review; a few words will suffice. Some suggestions: “I liked the author’s integration of characters from another favourite book into this story.” Or “Detailed descriptions of places made you feel as if you are actually there.” Or maybe “Could not find even one error of spelling or word usage” or “I liked the flow of the story.”

You do not need to be an author yourself to write a review! Just think about what you would tell a friend if you were recommending the book to them, and write it down. Review done!

How about if you did not like the book? If there is a reason other than “I didn’t like the story,” then explain it simply and courteously. “It was too long and the story meandered.” “It was too short to really get into the characters and events.” “Spelling was poor” or “Too many incorrect homophones.” “One of the story lines was never resolved.”

Some reviewers who don’t like a book seem to be almost vindictive in their reviews, as if they want to punish the author for not writing a book they liked. Revealing and describing salient plot points — i.e., spoilers — is very unkind. If you did not like the book, you can always return it; you don’t need to damage the author’s credibility or ruin the story for future readers just because it wasn’t your own cup of tea.

Remember what all of our moms told us: If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all!

Here are some additional tips for writing good, useful reviews.

And here are some books recently featured at Every Savage Can Dance to start you off. If you’ve read them, and especially if you’ve enjoyed them, please take a few minutes to leave a review. If you have not yet read them, follow the link to buy a copy, and then leave a review after you’ve read it.

Believe me, an author will thank you when you do! (Speaking of which, Many Thanks to Claudine Pepe at Just Jane 1813 for her lovely review of Desperate Hearts. If you have not yet read this book, do stop by to read her review and enter the giveaway for a chance to win a copy of the e-book)

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Please take a moment to let me know what you think: Click the Leave a Comment link at the top left-hand corner of this post. Thank you!

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Buy it/Review it here
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Regency beyond Jane Austen: The Four Lords Saga by Gianna Thomas. A review and a freebie!

 

One thing I love about reading Jane Austen and JAFF is learning more about Regency history. Other than a hilarious Blackadder Series 3 I had very little knowledge of this particular era (and certainly that “knowledge” was rather specious, to say the least). Along with the history I’ve learned from the stories themselves, they’ve inspired me to expand my own researches. So I like to sometimes go beyond Jane Austen and delve into various other aspects of the Regency. When The Four Lords collection went on sale last year I grabbed it up, and when the author asked me to review it I was delighted!

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Author Gianna Thomas

This tale, set in Regency England, is in fact four stories in one. It chronicles the lives of four handsome twenty-something debauched lords living a life of alcohol, gambling, and seducing anything in a skirt. They while away their time at their London club not caring for their futures beyond which lady they next intend to lure into their beds, while mocking the “leg-shackled” fools who prefer family life – including their own parents and families.

And then something changes: we follow the lords as one after the other they meet the women who will change their viewpoints and their lives as they fall in love, marry, and start families of their own. And we watch their growing understanding of what life, and family, are really all about.

Because of their reputations as degenerates, the lords often have some difficulty integrating back into polite society, so their lives are not so easily transformed. They in fact have to prove themselves worthy of their lady loves. How they manage this is often painful and often amusing.

fourlordsflirtationI greatly enjoyed seeing how each man is “tamed” by the love of a good woman. It may sound trite, but let’s face it: the romantic in us loves the challenge and its ultimate success! Who amongst us has not fantasized about being the lady who turns a bad boy into a good man?

(Unrelated to the books, here’s a musical take on this theme.)

Each lord’s story is intertwined with the others, and although you could probably read them as separate books I believe it was more enjoyable to read the collection all together.

What I liked best: The skillful interweaving of each story into the next and subsequent stories. One plot line begun in the first story reaches its resolution in the fourth story. By using the device of repeating the end of one story into the beginning of the next, the author allows the reader to in fact enjoy each story separately if they choose. As I much preferred to read the whole saga at one time, I found the repetition of certain salient events helpful as both a foreshadowing of what was to come as well as a reminder of what had already occurred.

The horses. Most of the characters shared an interest in horses, and I really liked all of the “horse talk.” Hey, what girl doesn’t love horses?!

What I liked least: I’m sorry to say that I did not care for the story of the fourth lord at all. I could not muster any sympathy for the characters; I found them to be quite prickly. I did not care for their situations either, and had a difficult time suspending disbelief about many of them. Perhaps people do respond to childhood trauma as described, and their loved ones in turn do respond to them as described, but I just couldn’t buy it. Too bad; I really liked the stories of the first three lords. Except for the resolution referred to above, I would have been happy for the saga to end after the third lord’s story.

For this reason, I give the saga four stars out of five.

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In short: There is in fact Regency life outside of Jane Austen Fan Fiction, and it’s very satisfying to have tasted a bit beyond that particular genre. Not that I’ll be abandoning JAFF, but this saga has convinced me to take another chance to step outside it again.

Be warned that there are a great many sexual situations in this story; no explicit sexual encounters but plenty of suggestive “almosts.”

These links are for the complete collection. Individual volumes are available separately.

fourlordssageKindle version at amazon.com

Paperback version at amazon.com

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THE FREEBIE!

A freebie for readers of Every Savage Can Dance and The Four Lords’ Saga:

Lord Windmere and Lady Jane back story. This is the first lord in the series and my favourite lord. You’ll want to pick this up to learn about their history together. It’s quite a charming read! And very short: Make yourself a pot of tea, sit back, and enjoy — you’ll finish the story and the tea at about the same time.

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Free kindle version at amazon

Connect with Gianna Thomas at:

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Please leave your comments on this post! Follow the Comments link at the upper left side of the post beneath the title. Thank you!
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And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. (Coming soon for Nook.) desp-hearts-cover

 

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