Introducing author Lela Bay and her debut book — Ruined Reputations — with a Review, Guest Post, and Giveaway

Welcome! It’s nice to be back at Every Savage Can Dance after a winter hiatus!

I do occasional beta-reading for one of my Facebook acquaintances, and amongst my favourite reads was this delightful book by new JAFF/Regency author Lela Bay. It actually comprises two stories in one. You may have noticed that I often crab about how disappointed I am when authors publish short stories as stand-alones, and how I wish they’d put two or more together when they publish them. (When you encounter a single engaging short story it’s kinda like you’re just starting a yummy meal only to see it yanked off the table before you’ve finished enjoying it.) So I was most gratified by Ruined Reputations, which comprises two delightfully engaging short romances. Enough to keep you occupied and happy through one cup of tea or a potful!

ruined reputations coverBlurbing the book

–The Unusual Manners of Mr. Aarons–
Rumors of Mr. Aarons’ unconventional ways are confirmed when he nearly yanks the bonnet off Emmaline’s cousin’s head. Drawn by his charm and good looks, Emmaline finds herself assisting him in his mysterious mission.

His obscure search appears to lead to her cousin, beautiful Catherine Connersfield. Catherine is the more sensible choice, but will she have him? More to the point, will Emmaline let her?

–Virtue’s Temptation–
Experience has taught Eleanor it’s better to be practical than passionate.

When she discovers Bitsy eloping with her French tutor, scandal threatens to ruin the girl.

To keep her reputation intact, Eleanor reluctantly chaperones the rebellious heiress.

Eleanor’s spotless character protects Bitsy, but behaving respectably proves difficult when Eleanor is tempted by the dangerously attractive Mr. Stinson.

If she fails it will end with … Ruined Reputations.

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About the author

LelaBay_Online_Profile

Lela lives in a modest house with her husband, children, and pets. Despite living in the far north, she requires a certain amount of sunshine each day or she gets grumpy. When she isn’t writing, she enjoys strolling, gardening, reading, and tea time with friends.

She enjoys stories with intimacy and humor.

Follow Lela on twitter @bay_lela.

 

 

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Guest Post by Lela Bay

When a young, impressionable girl is led astray in a period drama, don’t you wish someone with sense would see it happening and step in? Where are all the disapproving matrons who should be fretting and tutting?

Examples of young misses led astray abound in literature. In Pride & Prejudice alone, Georgiana, Mr. Darcy’s younger sister, was barely rescued after meeting secretly with George Wickham and planning to elope. Similarly, just think what trouble it would have saved Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet if careless Lydia had been hauled home to pout instead of succeeding in escaping her chaperones in Brighton for Wickham.

As Elizabeth tells Mr. Darcy, “I have just had a letter from Jane, with such dreadful news. It cannot be concealed from any one. My youngest sister has left all her friends—has eloped;—has thrown herself into the power of—of Mr. Wickham. They are gone off together from Brighton. You know him too well to doubt the rest. She has no money, no connections, nothing that can tempt him to—she is lost for ever.”

In Ruined Reputations, the heroine of Virtue’s Temptation, Eleanor, discovers impetuous Bitsy running off with someone unsuitable. Rather than allow the girl to destroy her future, proper Eleanor takes responsibility for her.

Of course, saving someone from their own bad behavior is more demanding—and entertaining—than anyone with good sense could expect. Bitsy resists Eleanor’s help, and Eleanor is relieved when Mr. Stinson appears in pursuit. Eleanor and Mr. Stinson join forces to get Bitsy home before her reputation is irreparably ruined.

Eleanor must behave with propriety, since Bitsy’s reputation rests on hers as chaperone, but traveling with Mr. Stinson makes that more and more difficult. He came chasing after Bitsy, but is he noble hero or thwarted suitor? And what if it is Eleanor who wishes to be pursued?

I love the tension in Regency romances between propriety and longing. Eleanor is proper but in many ways envies Bitsy’s impetuous youth.

Virtue’s Temptation and The Unusual Manners of Mr. Aarons form my first romance novella Ruined Reputations.

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And now for my review

Two romantic Regency-era stories in one volume? Yes, I like it very well.

To start, I liked wondering if Mr. Aarons was a gentleman or if he was a rogue or a rake. And I liked rooting for “the underdog” to capture his heart (altho’ it took a bit to discover whether or not he in fact had a heart!). Then I liked wondering what dangers a woman traveling alone and sticking her nose into somebody else’s business might encounter, particularly given that these stories are set during the English Regency era, when women did not have quite so much latitude in society as we do nowadays.

The scenes and characters played out believably in both stories, with good attention to period detail as well as to human (and canine) nature.  Both stories moved along at a good pace, engaging the reader fully. When I get to the end of a story and think “I wish I knew what happened next” — as I did twice with this book — the author has made a definite connection.

Please note that while there are several steamy encounters between some of the characters, this is a clean read. But the mind can wander, can’t it? 😉

What I liked most

Well, aside from the “two-fer” aspect of the book that I appreciate, I liked how well the characters were drawn. If I ever encounter any of them I’ll know them in a moment!

What I liked least

I would have liked a rather more definite conclusion regarding Eleanor and Mr. Stinson. Given that life doesn’t always work that way, however, I’m willing to wait and see if the characters compel Lela to bring them back for an encore.

In short

A fun read (times two) and a well-done book. Nicely written and tightly edited, which is the way I like my books. Oh, and the cover is beautiful too. I give Ruined Reputations a well-deserved five Darcys.

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I look forward to more good things from this author. Thank you for visiting me today, Lela!

Connect with Lela Bay via:

Her blog
Her Amazon Author Page
Twitter

Order your copy of Ruined Reputations in kindle, kindle/unlimited, or paperback.

 

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The Giveaway!!

Lela is offering an ebook copy of Ruined Reputations to two (2) lucky winners. To enter the Giveaway, please leave a comment on this review post. (You can also comment even if you don’t want to enter the Giveaway; your comments are always welcome.)

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And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. Also available on kindleUnlimited.

 

 

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Pemberley Ranch by Jack Caldwell — Review and Guest Post

Some months ago I read an excerpt from a JAFF story that transferred Pride & Prejudice into post-Civil War Texas. I thought the excerpt was terrific and placed the story on my ever-growing Must-Read list. About a month ago I won a paperback copy of the book from another blog – and as there is nothing better than a new book except a new book won as a prize, I was delighted and started digging in.

Now that I’ve read Pemberley Ranch twice within a month (no, once was not enough!), I’m ready to share my thoughts about it with the JAFF/Regency community.

Blurbing the book

PemberleyRanch_Final_CVRWhen the smoke has cleared from the battlefields and the civil war has finally ended, fervent Union supporter Beth Bennet reluctantly moves with her family from their home in Meryton, Ohio, to the windswept plains of Rosings, Texas. Handsome, haughty Will Darcy, a Confederate officer back from the war, owns half the land around Rosings, and his even haughtier cousin, Cate Burroughs, owns the other half.

In a town as small as Rosings, Beth and Will inevitably cross paths. But as Will becomes enchanted with the fiery Yankee, Beth won’t allow herself to warm to the man who represents the one thing she hates most: the army that killed her only brother.

But when carpetbagger George Whitehead arrives in Rosings, all that Beth thought to be true is turned on its head, and the only man who can save her home is the one she swore she’d never trust…

“It’s Pride and Prejudice meets Gone with the Wind-with that kind of romance and excitement.”
-Sharon Lathan, bestselling author of In the Arms of Mr. Darcy

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About the author

Caldwell-117bJack Caldwell is an author, amateur historian, professional economic developer, playwright, and like many Cajuns, a darn good cook. Born and raised in the Bayou Country of Louisiana, Jack and his wife, Barbara, are Hurricane Katrina victims who now make Florida their home. His nickname — The Cajun Cheesehead — came from his devotion to his two favorite NFL teams: the New Orleans Saints and the Green Bay Packers.

Always a history buff, Jack found and fell in love with Jane Austen in his twenties, struck by her innate understanding of the human condition.

When not writing or traveling with Barbara, Jack attempts to play golf. A devout convert to Roman Catholicism, Jack is married with three grown sons.

Jack’s blog postings–The Cajun Cheesehead Chronicles–appear regularly at Austen Variations.

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Guest post

Nearly – but clearly not quite – all of JAFF is written by, and read by, women who love Jane Austen’s writings. There is, however, a small group of male authors, and I would presume readers, in the JAFF community, and in my not so humble opinion they all must be very comfortable in their manhood to venture into JAFF territory! I asked Jack some rather impertinent questions about this and he was gracious enough to share his responses with me and ESCD.

What was your inspiration for writing this story?

About ten years ago, my wife and I were watching the TV news, and on it was a report about the Protestant Orange Order in Northern Ireland conducting their annual march celebrating Prince William the Orange’s victory over Catholic King James II at the Battle of the Boyne in 1690. Over three hundred years after the event, and the Protestants and Catholics are still bitter about it.

It then occurred to my wife and me that America is different from Europe. If we were like them, I, a son of Louisiana whose ancestors fought for the Confederacy, would never marry a lady whose parents grew up in Wisconsin, whose troops occupied and committed atrocities in Louisiana during the Civil War. That the vast majority of Americans would find the idea of a Southerner rejecting a Northerner (or vice versa) over what happened 140 years ago silly shows that we are not the prisoners of our past like our friends in Europe.

That got me thinking. How did we get here? Why did we not fall into that trap?

PEMBERLY RANCH is the story of Reconstruction in post-Civil War Texas. (The Deep South has been done—it’s called GONE WITH THE WIND.) I saw that the conflict between Jane Austen’s Elizabeth and Darcy in Regency England could fit such a story. Of course, to fit the time period, I amped up the tale a bit by killing off Beth Bennet’s only brother. I also pointed out there were heroes and villains on both sides of the war. Plus, I make Darcy a cowboy. It’s PRIDE AND PREJUDICE on steroids.

At the risk of being arrested for gender insensitivity, what inspired you to write in this genre given that it is a largely female domain of authors and readers?  

Several reasons. I really enjoy Jane Austen. She gave us wonderful, relatable, timeless characters. We have all met Mrs. Bennet, Mr. Collins, and Lady Catherine. Why not use her characters? It’s fun.

Another reason is that the plot of PRIDE AND PREJUDICE is timeless as well, and can easily be adapted to different periods in history.

One can’t forget that the majority of the readers are female. Write something that is relatable and enjoyable to them and they’ll read it.

I like being different. A lot of people in JAFF know I’m that crazy Cajun guy that writes Jane Austen-flavored historical romances. It gets me noticed.

And lastly, I like women. My favorite is my wife!

Well bless your soul, Jack!

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And now for my review

Most JAFF I read is set in the same era as Jane Austen wrote the original stories. A handful of authors have relocated the story and the characters to different time periods with varying success. Pemberley Ranch is one of the most successful time-shifting JAFFs I’ve yet enjoyed.

The main characters are mostly true to their original counterparts, altho’ there are a few secondary characters who have been improved, and several who are far worse than Jane ever drew them.

This version of our story has Elizabeth Bennet as a die-hard Yankee supporter while William Darcy is a former Confederate army officer. Needless to say this creates some difficulties between them. All the important elements of the original have, however, been transferred successfully to this version: the Hunsford proposal, Lydia’s escapades with Wickham, Darcy’s heroic retrieval of the wayward sister, Jane finding love with Bingley, and an angsty relationship full of misunderstandings between the two main characters which ends, of course, with their happy ever after.

This fast-paced story is full of cowboys, very good guys, really bad guys, very good ladies, really bad ladies. And the author weaves the real history of the American War Between the States into the narrative too. This war was not about slavery. Jack has Darcy explain exactly what it was about without being preachy or pedantic.

What I liked most

A truly evil Wickham (altho’ in this version his name is Whitehead). I admit to preferring evil Wickham to “merely” scoundrel Wickham.

An expanded, heroic, and very swoon-worthy role for Fitzwilliam. Hot dam, is there anything that man can not do? He also finds love in an engaging and endearing secondary story line.

As I mentioned above, the clear and non-pedantic outline of the real reasons why this awful war was fought.

The clever populating of the story with characters from Jane’s other stories – and even a nod to Gone with the Wind.

What I liked least

Elizabeth being called Beth. It’s not that I dislike the name, it’s just that Beth Bennet doesn’t flow as well as Elizabeth or Lizzy. (Yes, you’re right: that is really picky!)

The author’s apparent preference for Winchesters over Henrys. Ha!

In short

This is a tight, well-constructed story – and well-edited, with the few typos barely noticeable. And, of course, everyone ends up getting more or less what they deserve, for better or worse.

I’m delighted to give Pemberley Ranch 4.9 out of 5 Darcys (hey, I had to take off something in defense of Henry).

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As this is not a new publication – it was Jack’s first foray into JAFF, believe it or not – there’s no giveaway this time. I do hope you enjoyed meeting Pemberley Ranch. It’s available “wherever books are sold.” Here’s the link to the listing at amazon, where you can find it in Kindle, Kindle unlimited, and as a new or used paperback. Please note that this is not an affiliate link.

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Your comments are most welcome!

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And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. Also available on kindleUnlimited.

 

 

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Review and Giveaway: The Goodness of Men by Anngela Shroeder

Some months ago I had the pleasure of reading and posting a review of Anngela Shroeder’s first foray into JAFF, A Lie Universally Hidden. Today I have the pleasure of participating in the current blog tour for Anngela’s new book.

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Purchase at amazon (this is not an affiliate link)

Blurbing the book

“This will not do,” said Elizabeth. “You never will be able to make both of them good…Take your choice, but you must be satisfied with only one. There is but such a quantity of merit between them; just enough to make one good sort of man…” -Pride and Prejudice

From her youngest days, Elizabeth Bennet’s ability to accurately judge the character of others has been recognized and noted by those around her in such a consistent manner as to lead her to believe it herself. The misfortune of meeting Mr. Darcy, a wealthy landowner from the north, only solidifies this belief.
The memory of his disapproval of her family, proves his character is lacking and sadly unlike his childhood friend’s, the charming and affable Mr. Wickham, who is esteemed by all he meets. Although her opinion once lost is not lost forever, the effort to regain her favor is great.

With Elizabeth’s youngest sister fortunate to be in company with Mr. Wickham in Brighton since the spring, and her own travels to Kent cancelled, she must await the pleasures of a summer holiday to the North with her aunt and uncle Gardiner. However, it is there that she is once again thrust into Mr. Darcy’s presence and must determine if he is truly the architect of the many wrongs she has laid at his door.

Fitzwilliam Darcy cannot exorcise Elizabeth Bennet from his thoughts. A chance meeting at the estate of his friend reignites all the flames he has attempted to suppress since their last meeting. Believing in her partiality, he is stunned to overhear her true estimation of him and is determined to change her opinion.

Battling with memories and secrets from his past, Darcy must fight against his natural reserve to win the heart of the woman he loves.

Will the unexpected appearance of a stranger encourage Elizabeth’s change of heart? Might an episode from Mr. Darcy’s past force Elizabeth to see the man within? Can one man have all the goodness and the other only the appearance of it?

A sweet “Pride and Prejudice” reimagining, suitable for ages teen and up.

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About the author

anngela-schroederI have a degree in English with a concentration in British Literature and a Masters in Education. I love to travel, bake, and watch college football with my husband of 16 years and 3 rambunctious sons. My goal in life is to make not only my children, but also my students feel that they are loved, and to bring magic into everyone’s world. My weaknesses are yellow cake with chocolate frosting, French bread with real butter, and grape leaves and falafel. I live in California where I dream of Disney adventures and trips across the pond.

Connect with the Author:
• Facebook • Twitter • Goodreads • Amazon • Instagram

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And now for my review

With all the JAFFs being written — there must be hundreds of books that have come out even since my own discovery of this genre a mere two years ago — it becomes more and more of a challenge to develop a fresh perspective that tells a tale and holds the reader’s interest. Not to mention finding new ways to make readers fall in love with Mr. Darcy all over again — which, of course, is why so many of us adore this genre. The author succeeds on all these counts.

While many pundits have posited that “good guys finish last,” this story contradicts that “ladies love outlaws” meme. We find a number of good men — including, of course,  Darcy — who are adored by those who know them. Maybe not at first, but after getting to know them. Yes, there is the requisite angst of misunderstanding and the eventual revelation of true character. What would a JAFF story be without them?

Like many of my favourite JAFF stories, this one portrays Mr. Wickham as full-fledged evil. Darcy has been carrying around a heartbreakingly sad memory involving Wickham for most of his life — a secret that has defined much of Darcy’s devotion to honour and decency. You will never be able to think of Wickham as “merely” a scoundrel again.

Several new characters help point up Wickham’s malevolence while displaying their own integrity. I enjoyed meeting them and hope they make appearances in the author’s future work.

What I liked most

The sweetness of the scene when Elizabeth announces to Darcy that she is with child.

Wickham’s comeuppance. It took me a bit by surprise; I admit I was starting to get annoyed that one of the characters allowed Wickham to get away with his actions. In the end, however, I was smiling at the perfect resolution. Nicely done, Anngela!

As I noted previously, I very much liked the new characters introduced here.

What I liked least

I was a little disappointed that two characters who I was sure would come together did not. Oh well, they both found happy endings elsewhere.

In short

A compelling story that hits all the buttons for good JAFF — and a good story period: believable and (mostly) likeable characters, a truly nasty villain, and a happily ever after for our dear couple.

In my new ratings system, I gladly give The Goodness of Men five Darcys:

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The Giveaway

Anngela is giving away two ebook copies, which includes international readers, and one autographed paperback copy to readers with a U.S. mailing address. You are invited to enter by clicking on the Rafflecopter link below. Entry must be received no later than Saturday, October 15, 2017:

Rafflecopter Giveaway

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Your comments, as always, are most welcome!

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And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. Also available on kindleUnlimited.

 

 

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The Murmur of Masks, and a tour of the Regency, by Catherine Kullmann

catherine-kullmanI should begin this post by saying that Catherine Kullmann has become one of my favourite authors. Her Regency stories are always well researched, well written, and well edited. My introduction to Catherine’s work was Perception and Illusion, reviewed here. Her brief autobiographical notes explain clearly why I was originally drawn to her writings. Recently I read The Murmur of Masks and couldn’t wait to share it with those of you who love good historical romances.

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Blurbing the book

murmur-of-masksIt is 1803. The Treaty of Amiens has collapsed and England is again at war with France. Eighteen-year-old Olivia must say goodbye to her father and brother, both of whom are recalled to active service in the navy. Not long afterwards, her mother, who has been her anchor all her life, dies suddenly. As a result, she loses her home. Adrift and vulnerable, she accepts the offer of a marriage of convenience from Jack Rembleton, an older man whose brother, Lord Rembleton, is pressuring him to marry and sire the heir to the title Rembleton has failed to provide. Olivia hopes that love will grow between them, but Jack’s secrets will prevent this and Olivia must learn that she has thrown away her youth and the chance of love.

When Luke Fitzmaurice, a young man prevented by ill-health from joining the army, meets Olivia at a ball, he is instantly smitten but she must tell him she is already married. Ten years pass, during which each faces up to life’s challenges but then fate throws them together again. Olivia is finally free, but before they can explore what might be between them, Napoleon escapes from Elba and Luke, who is determined this time not to be found wanting, joins Wellington’s army in Brussels.

They say: “I read it very quickly as the story was very compelling and the characters really came to life and engaged me.” “Depicts both the harsh reality of the battlefield and the pleasures and challenges of society life in England.” “I was hooked from start to finish.” Winner of a Chill with a Book Award.

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Guest Post

Please enjoy Catherine’s beautifully illustrated tour of the British Regency period.

The Regency Illustrated

One of the joys of writing historical novels is that you have an unimpeachable excuse to rummage in flea markets, second-hand book shops, antique fairs, and curiosity shops. My books are set in the extended Regency period from 1800 to 1830 and I was amazed to discover the wealth of coloured contemporary illustrations of the period over and above the portraits and architectural prints I had expected. Print shops selling cartoons and caricatures thrived, and ladies’ journals published fashion plates and engravings of eminent persons in each issue. In addition, publishers had progressed beyond the usual frontispiece to produce lavishly illustrated books that are the forerunners of today’s graphic novels. I have chosen five of these illustrations to take you on a tour of London from the lowest dive to the Prince Regent’s court.

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Here we meet Bob Tallyho Esq. and his cousin the Hon. Tom Dashall blowing a cloud and taking their heavy wet at the Black diamond merchants’ free & easy King Charles’s crib, Scotland Yard.

Glossary

Blowing a cloud                        Smoking

Heavy wet                                  Beer, especially porter and stout

Black Diamond Merchant      Coalman

Crib                                              Here, a public house

Free & easy                                A social gathering (gen. at a public house) where smoking, drinking, and singing are allowed.

Bang-up                                     first-rate

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And here we see Tom and Bob in Hyde Park, Cutting a Dash among the Pinks in Rotten Row. A ‘Pink of the Fashion’ is a gentleman who is at ‘the top of the mode.’

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While Tom and Bob were well-born young men about town, Dr Syntax, the hapless protagonist of at least four volumes by different authors, was a not-so-young curate whose outings tended to end in disaster of some kind. We encounter him and his wife at Vauxhall Gardens, holding up a slice of the ham that was famous, or infamous, for its thinness, which inevitably led to a steep bill at the end of the night.

Before them soon was laid a slice
which some might think was very nice,
But through whose thin, transparent fold,
You might the distant stars behold,
Was not much better than a jelly;
Another, and another still,
Must feed the craving ivory mill,
And still to every keen performer
“The last is welcome as the former.”

 

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We next visit a fashionable ball. In this illustration from The Adventures of a Post-Captain, you can just see the dancers in the background at the top left, but all attention is focused on the pink sofa where our hero woos his lady, ignoring the envious glances of others less favoured. The text beneath it reads:

The maiden listen’d, blush’d and look’d,
As she would have the words rebuk’d
But there was something in her eye.
Which seem’d to give the words the lie.

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Finally we attend a levée at Carlton House, seat of the Prince Regent, where Johnny Newcome, fresh from the Campaign in the Peninsula, presents him with the Trophies of Battle. Although our hero is fictional, this scene alludes to the retrieval of the baton of the French Marshal Jourdan from the abandoned coach of Napoleon’s elder brother Joseph Bonaparte, whom Napoleon installed as King of Spain in 1808. Joseph made a desperate attempt to escape Wellington’s advancing army in 1813, losing almost all his baggage in his headlong flight.  The baton was given to Wellington, who sent it to the Prince Regent.

To me, these prints and their accompanying text open a window on the real Regency. Perhaps it is because they were created with no thought to posterity that they are so appealing two hundred years later. Their vitality and immediacy invite us to step into their world, and I for one cannot resist.

©Catherine Kullmann 2017

Nor can I, Catherine!!

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And now for my review

This story opens heartbreakingly sadly. Young Olivia suffers the loss of her beloved mother, and inasmuch as her father and brother are off fighting the interminable war with France, she is left on her own with disappointed hopes. In Regency society, being without male protection translates as being quite vulnerable. Fortunately her uncle steps in to help. He approves when an acquaintance asks for Olivia’s hand in marriage. Unfortunately, neither Olivia nor her uncle are aware of who and what this acquaintance really is, what are his motives, and where his heart is truly engaged, setting Olivia up for a sad and loveless marriage of convenience.

After she is married she meets the man of her dreams. Altho’ he is a bit of a rascal (or maybe because of it!), I fell in love with Luke almost from the moment I “met” him. Illness prevents him from fulfilling his dream, as a second son, of joining the military, and he lives a rather dissolute life as he is also set adrift by his own disappointed hopes.

Ultimately, of course, they are both free to marry and enjoy a life of happiness together. Getting to that point, however, is not an easy straight line. The many twists and turns of their relationship are the stuff of this intriguing story, a story I could barely put down once I had started it.

What I liked most

There was so much I liked about this book that I hardly know where to start. Perhaps with the clever references to Pride and Prejudice? I’ll leave it to you to make these delicious discoveries for yourself.

Then there were the engaging characters and situations. All had the ring of reality to them, and I was pleased to be sharing their lives with them. One situation, and character, I had already been introduced to: Lallie Tamrisk, the star of Perception and Illusion, makes a cameo appearance, and I was happy to see her again, in a shocking scene touched on in P&I and featured in the 1972 movie Lady Caroline Lamb. Then I realized that P&I was written after TMoM. So now I wonder if Lallie simply grew into a larger role in P&I, and if we’ll see her yet again in Catherine’s next book? (Hint hint, Catherine!)

The new-to-me Regency words and expressions, as well as the general Regency history, that I learned here.

What I liked least

The vividly detailed description of The Battle of Waterloo. We who have never seen war close-up know events such as these simply as ticks on the timeline of history. To Luke and the other participants, however, they were far more personal, and even tho’ I admit to skipping some of this difficult reading, I actually found myself having nightmares about this nightmarish battle.

In short

If you enjoy well-researched and well-written historical novels incorporating a not-always-tender love story with a happily-ever-after ending, you will surely enjoy reading The Murmur of Masks.

I give it an enthusiastic five-star rating:

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To learn more about Catherine Kullman and her writings, and for lots more treats and goodies, visit her website.

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Your comments, as always, are most welcome!

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And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. Now also available on kindleUnlimited.

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