Elizabeth’s Choice by Gianna Thomas — Review, guest post, excerpt. And win a free copy!

Happy Spring, my friends!

While I read, and usually enjoy, books by many authors, there are just a handful of authors whose new books I truly look forward to reading. One of those authors is Gianna Thomas. Ever since devouring her The Four Lords Saga in record time, I’ve been hooked.

elizabeths-choice-cover

After reading Gianna’s Darcy Chooses, I waited rather impatiently for her newest book, and could not have been happier when Elizabeth’s Choice was published recently. Again, I devoured it quickly, and now I’m ready to tell you all about it!

Gianna has kindly stopped by to add an excerpt, brief guest post, and a giveaway. But first …

divider-line

Blurbing the Book

Elizabeth’s Choice is the long-awaited sequel to Darcy Chooses – The Complete Novel. An excerpt from ‘Darcy vs Bingley’ is also included.

Finally, Darcy has made Elizabeth his own as she has become his wife, much to the delight of both. Finding joy with her and true happiness that he hasn’t had in years, his life is complete. And his wife is more than pleased to be Mrs. Elizabeth Darcy with the one she admires above all men.

Embarking on their honeymoon to Ireland, the two will draw ever closer as they find more in common as tourists in a country with a history and heritage as rich as that of England. Darcy strengthens the bond with old friends as Elizabeth makes new friends that will enrich her life as Mrs. Darcy while learning more about those who inhabit the Emerald Isle. But all is not sweetness and delight as an old enemy appears and threatens the safety and even the lives of the lovebirds. Will they survive the encounter or will it leave a memory that will forever scar the heart?

divider-line

Guest post by Gianna Thomas

gianna thomasI asked Gianna what inspired her to write this story, and this is what she told me:

First, I needed a sequel to Darcy Chooses, and I liked the idea of them honeymooning in Ireland. I also wanted to show the close relationship that Darcy and Elizabeth were developing. Both were innocents going into the marriage, and they’ve discovered that whether mentally, emotionally, physically, or spiritually, they are well matched by being similar or by completing the other. So, I concentrated more on that relationship than anything else.

There is a fair amount of Ireland’s history included and some angst as well. I think I did more research for this book than all my others put together: from clipper ships to Blarney Castle.

Me again: If you’ve been following Gianna on Facebook, you’ve seen numerous lovely photos and videos, and heard the delightful music — all sourced from Ireland — that she has shared with her readers in the past few months.

Don’t worry if you missed any or all of these offerings — I’ve provided links below so you can follow Gianna to your heart’s content!

Now that you know why she wrote it, here’s a sample of the story itself.

divider-line

A tantalizing excerpt from Elizabeth’s Choice 

divider-line

And now for my review

Several authors have created stories about Darcy and Elizabeth after they married, but few have done it as well. Gianna has drawn them as a happy, loving couple wrapped up in the joy of new discoveries about each other and about themselves. And even one enchanting secret about Elizabeth that the perceptive Mr. Darcy deduces even before Elizabeth is aware of it herself!

The couple have decided to honeymoon in Ireland, and after making their preparations they embark on a journey that is by turns romantic, educational, and alarming. A hair-raising brush with ruffians in Dublin is countered by a wonderful evening of music, dance, food, drink, and new friends at an Irish pub. Then a most excellent journey through Irish history gives way to a terrifying ordeal aboard ship. The balance of delight and dismay keeps the story fresh and captivating.

Of course everything ends happily — like you, I cannot bear to read a Pride & Prejudice variation or sequel that does not have a happy-ever-after, no matter when “ever” begins!

divider-line

What I liked most

The realistic playfulness between the characters, just what you’d expect of two young, in-love newlyweds.

An attack by a gang led by none other than Mr. Wickham. I confess that I do prefer a truly evil Wickham over a “mere” rogue!

Learning about Irish history, from clipper ships to Blarney castle, to Irish music and step-dancing.

divider-line

What I liked least

There wasn’t much, altho’ as I said I do like a story featuring an evil Wickham, and would have been happy for the episode to have continued somewhat longer. Actually I would have liked the entire story to have gone on longer. True, when we’re enjoying a story we want it to go on forever, but this seemed more like a novella than a novel.

divider-line

In short

A well-written and well-edited story that captured my imagination and held my attention, and left me wanting more! I give Elizabeth’s Choice an enthusiastic 4.9 Darcys.

darcys-4.9-rating

divider-line

Now for the giveaway, which is open worldwide

Gianna is offering two lucky readers a chance to win one of two e-copies of Elizabeth’s Choice. Winners will be chosen at the end of this week.

divider-line

Stalk Gianna Thomas

Via her website

On her amazon author page

Follow Gianna on Facebook (be sure to “like” her page!)

divider-line

Thank you for visiting Every Savage Can Dance today, and good luck in the giveaway!

divider-line

desp-hearts-cover

 

And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. Also available on kindleUnlimited.

 

 

# # # #

Advertisements

Introducing author Lela Bay and her debut book — Ruined Reputations — with a Review, Guest Post, and Giveaway

Welcome! It’s nice to be back at Every Savage Can Dance after a winter hiatus!

I do occasional beta-reading for one of my Facebook acquaintances, and amongst my favourite reads was this delightful book by new JAFF/Regency author Lela Bay. It actually comprises two stories in one. You may have noticed that I often crab about how disappointed I am when authors publish short stories as stand-alones, and how I wish they’d put two or more together when they publish them. (When you encounter a single engaging short story it’s kinda like you’re just starting a yummy meal only to see it yanked off the table before you’ve finished enjoying it.) So I was most gratified by Ruined Reputations, which comprises two delightfully engaging short romances. Enough to keep you occupied and happy through one cup of tea or a potful!

ruined reputations coverBlurbing the book

–The Unusual Manners of Mr. Aarons–
Rumors of Mr. Aarons’ unconventional ways are confirmed when he nearly yanks the bonnet off Emmaline’s cousin’s head. Drawn by his charm and good looks, Emmaline finds herself assisting him in his mysterious mission.

His obscure search appears to lead to her cousin, beautiful Catherine Connersfield. Catherine is the more sensible choice, but will she have him? More to the point, will Emmaline let her?

–Virtue’s Temptation–
Experience has taught Eleanor it’s better to be practical than passionate.

When she discovers Bitsy eloping with her French tutor, scandal threatens to ruin the girl.

To keep her reputation intact, Eleanor reluctantly chaperones the rebellious heiress.

Eleanor’s spotless character protects Bitsy, but behaving respectably proves difficult when Eleanor is tempted by the dangerously attractive Mr. Stinson.

If she fails it will end with … Ruined Reputations.

teapot-bw-clipart

About the author

LelaBay_Online_Profile

Lela lives in a modest house with her husband, children, and pets. Despite living in the far north, she requires a certain amount of sunshine each day or she gets grumpy. When she isn’t writing, she enjoys strolling, gardening, reading, and tea time with friends.

She enjoys stories with intimacy and humor.

Follow Lela on twitter @bay_lela.

 

 

teapot-bw-clipart

Guest Post by Lela Bay

When a young, impressionable girl is led astray in a period drama, don’t you wish someone with sense would see it happening and step in? Where are all the disapproving matrons who should be fretting and tutting?

Examples of young misses led astray abound in literature. In Pride & Prejudice alone, Georgiana, Mr. Darcy’s younger sister, was barely rescued after meeting secretly with George Wickham and planning to elope. Similarly, just think what trouble it would have saved Mr. Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet if careless Lydia had been hauled home to pout instead of succeeding in escaping her chaperones in Brighton for Wickham.

As Elizabeth tells Mr. Darcy, “I have just had a letter from Jane, with such dreadful news. It cannot be concealed from any one. My youngest sister has left all her friends—has eloped;—has thrown herself into the power of—of Mr. Wickham. They are gone off together from Brighton. You know him too well to doubt the rest. She has no money, no connections, nothing that can tempt him to—she is lost for ever.”

In Ruined Reputations, the heroine of Virtue’s Temptation, Eleanor, discovers impetuous Bitsy running off with someone unsuitable. Rather than allow the girl to destroy her future, proper Eleanor takes responsibility for her.

Of course, saving someone from their own bad behavior is more demanding—and entertaining—than anyone with good sense could expect. Bitsy resists Eleanor’s help, and Eleanor is relieved when Mr. Stinson appears in pursuit. Eleanor and Mr. Stinson join forces to get Bitsy home before her reputation is irreparably ruined.

Eleanor must behave with propriety, since Bitsy’s reputation rests on hers as chaperone, but traveling with Mr. Stinson makes that more and more difficult. He came chasing after Bitsy, but is he noble hero or thwarted suitor? And what if it is Eleanor who wishes to be pursued?

I love the tension in Regency romances between propriety and longing. Eleanor is proper but in many ways envies Bitsy’s impetuous youth.

Virtue’s Temptation and The Unusual Manners of Mr. Aarons form my first romance novella Ruined Reputations.

teapot-bw-clipart

And now for my review

Two romantic Regency-era stories in one volume? Yes, I like it very well.

To start, I liked wondering if Mr. Aarons was a gentleman or if he was a rogue or a rake. And I liked rooting for “the underdog” to capture his heart (altho’ it took a bit to discover whether or not he in fact had a heart!). Then I liked wondering what dangers a woman traveling alone and sticking her nose into somebody else’s business might encounter, particularly given that these stories are set during the English Regency era, when women did not have quite so much latitude in society as we do nowadays.

The scenes and characters played out believably in both stories, with good attention to period detail as well as to human (and canine) nature.  Both stories moved along at a good pace, engaging the reader fully. When I get to the end of a story and think “I wish I knew what happened next” — as I did twice with this book — the author has made a definite connection.

Please note that while there are several steamy encounters between some of the characters, this is a clean read. But the mind can wander, can’t it? 😉

What I liked most

Well, aside from the “two-fer” aspect of the book that I appreciate, I liked how well the characters were drawn. If I ever encounter any of them I’ll know them in a moment!

What I liked least

I would have liked a rather more definite conclusion regarding Eleanor and Mr. Stinson. Given that life doesn’t always work that way, however, I’m willing to wait and see if the characters compel Lela to bring them back for an encore.

In short

A fun read (times two) and a well-done book. Nicely written and tightly edited, which is the way I like my books. Oh, and the cover is beautiful too. I give Ruined Reputations a well-deserved five Darcys.

darcys-five-rating-sml

I look forward to more good things from this author. Thank you for visiting me today, Lela!

Connect with Lela Bay via:

Her blog
Her Amazon Author Page
Twitter

Order your copy of Ruined Reputations in kindle, kindle/unlimited, or paperback.

 

teapot-bw-clipart

The Giveaway!!

Lela is offering an ebook copy of Ruined Reputations to two (2) lucky winners. To enter the Giveaway, please leave a comment on this review post. (You can also comment even if you don’t want to enter the Giveaway; your comments are always welcome.)

divider-line

desp-hearts-cover

 

And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. Also available on kindleUnlimited.

 

 

# # # #

All things matrimonial

martrimonial ladderCatherine Kullman, the author who brought you the Matrimonial Map, now introduces you to the Matrimonial Ladder. This rare Regency-era “comic book” is absolutely delightful and most charmingly illustrated.

Do stop by Catherine’s home on the Web and take a look.  While you’re there, you might want to see what other goodies you can find on her website. It’s one of my very favourites; one reason why is her Regency stories, like this one that I reviewed a while ago.

Apologies to my ESCD readers for being out of touch for so long … I went through a bout of ill health, including a (blessedly!) brief hospital stay, and am just catching up now. I have some wonderful reviews and other “stuff” — including giveaways — coming up soon, so please stop by again. G0d bless you, and wishing you all good health and happiness!

Your comments, as always, are most welcome.

divider-line

desp-hearts-coverAnd … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here.

# # # #

 

 

Two sleep nights

DH and I have recently been caring for a couple of aging pets. We’d wake up in the middle of the night, either of our own accord or because some particular noise alerted us to see if either of them needed something in the night. After tending to whatever needed tending, we would go back to bed, on good nights falling asleep straight away but just as often struggling to return to our slumbers.

On those long white nights, and the following mornings when I could barely drag myself around the house, I was reminded of a custom I learned about several years ago and that has ever since fascinated me: the practice of two sleeps. And decided to go with it instead of fighting it.

two-sleeps 8 hour sleepHumans did not always spend eight (or so) hours at one stretch sleeping through the night. From ancient times our ancestors would sleep for four or five hours, wake up, spend anywhere from two to four hours in various activities, and then return to dreamland until sunrise. It was the common practice, and it lasted until about the end of the nineteenth century. So altho’ not a uniquely Regency-era practice, people certainly would have been two-sleeping during Jane Austen’s lifetime.

After waking from the first sleep, people engaged in numerous activities. These included feeding babies or the sick of the household; tending fires that would otherwise extinguish themselves during the night; checking on the welfare of farm animals to ensure they were not being set upon by predators or thieves. Many people spent the time reading or praying, and in fact there were specific prayers for this time of night. Family members might find this a convenient time for chatting with each other, while husbands and wives often engaged in sexual relations. Physicians recommended having sex after the first sleep as both parties were generally more relaxed and it was likelier to result in conception.

two-sleeps cartoon woman asleep at nightAs the practice of two sleeps was so common, visits were often made to equally wakeful neighbours. Socializing also served to remind potential nighttime thieves that their intended targets were awake and alert.

Two-sleeping faded in popularity with the advent of electricity; specifically indoor lights and outdoor street lamps. With more light available, people extended their daytime activities to the nights, and began to go to sleep later, leaving too little time for two sleeps and a wakeful period in-between. Thus our current practice of getting (or trying to get!) eight consecutive hours of sleep each night developed.

While we lost one of our pets recently – cancer ultimately claimed our beloved dog Rufus – we still tend to our elderly kitty Shana when she requires attention during the night, as well as to any other critters who might be temporarily indisposed. We two-slept for most of last weekend, for example, when our kitty Spunky chewed up a silk flower and spent the better part of the next two days puking it up at all hours. (Yes, we took him to the vet and he’s just fine now.)

two-sleeps cat and dogNext time you find yourself awake in the middle of the night, don’t panic or think that you absolutely must get back to sleep right away. Take a cue from our ancestors and stay awake for a while – productively awake, that is, by engaging in one or more of the activities enumerated above, or perhaps by sketching out your next storyline or book review. Or jot down any part of your dreams that you can recall. Or catch up on your reading. In fact, this is often the time when I get most of my own reading done!

Your comments, as always, are most welcome.

divider-line

And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. A perfect read for your two-sleep night’s awake hours!desp-hearts-cover

 

# # # #

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

# # # #

A Dance with Mr Darcy by Regina Jeffers: Review, excerpt, and giveaway

I’m so pleased to be reviewing Regina’s latest book, and am also delighted that she is offering readers of ESCD not only an excerpt but also a very generous giveaway!

Blurbing the book:

regina-jeffers
Author Regina Jeffers

The reason fairy tales end with a wedding is no one wishes to view what happens next.

Five years earlier, Darcy had raced to Hertfordshire to soothe Elizabeth Bennet’s qualms after Lady Catherine’s venomous attack, but a devastating carriage accident left him near death for months and cost him his chance at happiness with the lady. Now, they meet again upon the Scottish side of the border, but can they forgive all that has transpired in those years? They are widow and widower; however, that does not mean they can take up where they left off. They are damaged people, and healing is not an easy path. To know happiness they must fall in love with the same person all over again.

divider-line

The excerpt:

A Dance With Mr Darcy copy 2
Buy at amazon

Chapter 1

A Dance with Mr. Darcy: A Pride and Prejudice Vagary

“IT IS SHE,” HE MURMURED as his gaze settled upon her back. Even without viewing her countenance, Darcy’s body recognized the woman some thirty feet removed. If it were not for the biting wind stinging his cheeks, he might think himself asleep, for not a night had passed since he was last in her company—and all the previous nights of their acquaintance—that he did not dream of her; yet, she was not a dream, but rather flesh and blood. His breathing hitched higher.

During the daylight hours, he had prided himself upon not permitting his mind to conjure up her memory more than a half dozen times per day, but he always welcomed her into slumber’s embrace each night. Even during the fourteen months he had claimed Miss Amelia Davenport to wife, it had been Elizabeth Bennet in his arms. Often, Darcy had felt guilty for closing his eyes and pretending that his sweet, docile Amelia was the enticing maid from Hertfordshire who had stolen his heart long before Lady Matlock had arranged a joining between him and her niece.

“What is Elizabeth doing some twenty miles northwest of the Scottish border?” he whispered as he watched her checking the shutters of the small, but tidy-looking, inn in preparation for the storm. “And where is her husband?”

The word “husband” left a bitter taste in Darcy’s mouth. It was some six months after her marriage before he learned of Elizabeth’s joining, and by then there was little he could do but to continue with his life, such as it was at the time. It was only the realization that her marriage was forever that permitted him to accept his Aunt Matlock’s matchmaking schemes.

“Should I ask within if the innkeeper has accommodations available, Mr. Darcy?” His footman waited several feet off Darcy’s shoulder.

“No, that is not necessary, Jasper. Even if we must sleep upon the floor, we can travel no further with the coach having a broken crank neck.” He glanced again across the busy inn yard. If he were a sane man, he would continue to the next village, which was reportedly fewer than three miles removed, according to his coachman. Walking would not be the best choice, considering the condition of his left ankle and the knowledge of the approaching storm; however, he had long ago accepted his obsession with the woman shaking out her skirts and admiring her work. Sanity and Elizabeth Bennet were in opposition. “I will speak to the lady; you speak to the ostler in preparation for Mr. Farrin and my coach’s arrival.”

“Yes, sir.”

Darcy paused before making his way across the inn yard. What type of welcome would he receive? They had so often been at odds, but he assumed they had reached a better understanding when they had been together at Pemberley. Yet, the debacle with her youngest sister’s elopement had proven nearly more than he could manage. Nevertheless, he thought he had carved a path to a happy joining between him and Elizabeth, but G0d had a way of laughing in a man’s face when said man attempted to take control of another’s future.

“Might as well be hung for a sheep as for a lamb,” he chastised and began picking his way across the yard. The cane he had always carried for fashion and for protection from footpads now assisted in supporting his weight. “Could not dance at the Meryton assembly now,” he repeated in ironic tones. “No matter how tolerable I might find the lady.”

He did not step up to the wooden walkway; instead, Darcy remained in the inn yard where he might enjoy the hitch of her skirt to expose a trim ankle as she stepped upon a low stool to reach the upper shutter. He cleared his throat before saying, “Good afternoon, Miss Elizabeth.”

Her shoulders stiffened, and he noted that her fingers clutched at the wooden shutter for support. After a long pause, she stepped down and slowly turned to face him. If he thought he might receive a warm greeting, he was sadly mistaken. “Good afternoon, Mr. Darcy. However, I must insist that you no longer refer to me as ‘Miss Elizabeth.’ I have been Mrs. McCaffney for nearly four years.”

“I fear I never knew the gentleman’s name,” Darcy said in apology.

She pulled her shawl tighter about her as if to ward off his words as much as to brace against the wind that had kicked up. “I assure you Mr. McCaffney could never be accused of being a gentleman. All he owned was this fine establishment.” She gestured wildly, which was quite uncharacteristic of the lady he knew. Elizabeth Bennet always displaed confidence, even when she had erred miserably.

“Nevertheless, I would know pleasure in having Mr. McCaffney’s acquaintance,” he said in strained politeness. He thought he would go mad when he had learned of her marriage. Bingley had encountered Sir William Lucas in Town, and Sir William had shared the news of the marriages of both Miss Bennet and of Miss Elizabeth. While Bingley had ranted and raved against the injustice, all Darcy could do was to bite hard upon his tongue and swallow the cry of anguish ripping through him. The torment had been worse than any pain he had ever suffered, including the one that never disappeared from his left leg.

“Mr. McCaffney met his end one summer night some two years back when he thought to take a boat out to meet a group of smugglers off the Scottish coast,” she stated without emotions in her expression or in her voice.

“Then who is the inn’s proprietor?” Darcy demanded in incredulity.

She spoke in clipped tones. “I own McCaffney’s Coaching House.” She nodded to his coach as it limped into the yard. “I see you require assistance. I suppose you desire accommodations also.”

There was something in her tone that stifled any hope he might have experienced with the news of her husband’s death. “If it would not be an imposition,” he replied in contrition.

“I am accustomed to those who practice impositions.” Gathering her skirts about her, she turned on her heels to lead the way. “I fear with the approaching storm, I am already quite full. I have but one small room at the back of the third story passageway. It is nothing of the nature of which you are accustomed, but it is clean and dry.”

He expelled a long sigh of exhaustion. The walk had claimed more from him than he had expected. And now he was to revisit his emotional connection to the woman entering the inn door without a glance in his direction to see if he followed. Perhaps G0d meant for him to confront his ghosts, so he might carve out a fresh path and perhaps come to know a bit of peace, at last. Darcy had long ago given up on the possibility of happiness. With a soft grunt signaling the stiffness in his step, he lurched forward to enter the darkened common room. She waited for him behind a high-legged table about three feet long and covered with a white linen cloth.

“What brings you to Scotland, Mr. Darcy?” she asked as she handed him a sharpened pen to sign the register. Meanwhile, she retrieved a ring of keys from a locked box and selected the one he would require.

“I inherited a small property some five and twenty miles north of here,” he said cautiously. “It is near the larger Fitzwilliam estate. I planned to stay at Lord Matlock’s manor house while inspecting the inherited land.”

“Most would do so in the spring, rather than in January,” she remarked without looking upon him.

“Which is exactly why I chose this time of year. No one will have made preparations or renovations to impress me. I mean to know whether the property can sustain the livings that depend upon it.”

She turned to lead the way up the stairs. “Follow me.”

Since his accident, stairs were his least favorite architectural element of any structure, but he could customarily manage; however, on this particular day, his leg was slow to respond to more exercise. Nonetheless, he gritted his teeth to persevere, for he did not wish for the woman slowly climbing the stairs ahead of him to view him to be as weak as he sometimes felt.

She glanced over her shoulder at him. “Is the Fitzwilliam estate of which you speak the colonel’s family? How fares your cousin?”

Darcy slowed to keep his balance upon the narrow stairs. “Fitzwilliam is more than my cousin. He is my brother, for he is Georgiana’s husband.”

An ironic smile turned up the corners of her lips. “Then the colonel claimed his heiress. It gladdens me to hear it.”

“I assure you, convenience was not the reason for their joining,” he snapped.

Her chin rose in predictable defiance. “I never thought a marriage between Miss Darcy and Colonel Fitzwilliam would be anything but a happy occasion for your family. My brief acquaintance with your sister said she would never settle for less than a comfortable marriage. I simply recalled something the colonel shared while we were all at Rosings Park.”

A familiar pain of regret caught Darcy’s good sense. “I imagine you would have accepted Fitzwilliam’s proposal if my cousin had been in a position to utter one.”

“I thought I knew something of the colonel’s character,” she said in defensive tones.

“And nothing of mine,” he charged.

Before she could respond, a familiar countenance appeared at the foot of the stairs. “Lizzy,” she called, but halted when she spotted him on the stairs. “Well, look who the cat—“

Elizabeth interrupted in impatient tones, “What is amiss, Lydia?”

The chit smiled knowingly at him before she answered her sister. “Mr. Simpson and the mail coach have arrived with three passengers. He says the roads are quickly becoming impassable. He means to stay the night and perhaps longer. I told him we were full, but he insists.”

Darcy noted the girl’s “we,” and he wondered if he were also to encounter his long-time foe, Mr. Wickham.

“Tell Simpson we can put him and the others on mattresses in the private room. If more arrive, we may need to ask some of our regulars to share rooms. We always manage somehow, do we not, Lyddie?”

Her sister chuckled with a sly look. “We do very well, Lizzy.” Mrs. Wickham gave him a long look. “Will Mr. Darcy be required to share a room?”

“As Mr. Darcy has the small corner room, I doubt sharing will be necessary or even possible,” Elizabeth explained.

“I would expect nothing less,” the girl said with a lift of her shoulders in indifference before she returned to the noisy entrance.

“I fear you must forego a private room for supper, sir,” Elizabeth said as she turned back to the task at hand.

He released a long sigh. Nothing had changed: They were still from step. Following her slow progress, he said, “If it would not be an imposition, please send a tray to my room. I am a bit weary.” He spoke the truth: His ankle throbbed from the nearly two-miles’ walk to reach the inn. He needed to remove his boot and rest his ankle and calf muscle. “If you are too busy, Jasper can carry it up.” He knew the footman would call at his room to act as Darcy’s valet for the evening. “I did not ask, but I assumed there would be rooms for Jasper and Mr. Farrin.”

“Above the stables, there are several small rooms created by low partitions. All have cots and mattresses. The animals keep the area warm with their heat.”

What more was there to say between them? She was obviously not happy to see him upon her threshold. “Then our business is settled,” Darcy announced as she handed him the room key and stepped aside.

“It is as it always was, Mr. Darcy,” she said with a snit. “Your wishes are absolutes.” She turned to shove her way past him while he was left wondering why she despised him so. Mayhap Mr. Wickham had created new lies to fill her mind. Needless to say, with Mrs. Wickham under her roof, it would be easy for Darcy’s former friend to do so. It was as if she had learned to loathe him again. “And here I thought after our time at Pemberley that we could, at least, claim a friendship,” he murmured as he closed the room door on her retreating form.

divider-line

Wow, right?

And now for my review:

All JAFF/Regency readers, I suppose, have their favourite authors. Regina Jeffers is one of mine because I know her stories will always be not only well-written and very much respectful of the original, but both make me smile and tug at my heartstrings, and I’ll learn one or two things about (Regency) history to boot.  A Dance with Mr Darcy does not disappoint, and also encompasses one of my basic requirements for JAFF: I must fall even more in love with Mr Darcy by book’s end. Check, check, check, check, and double-check.

From the very first sentence I was hooked, as I am sure you were too when you read the excerpt. You can feel Darcy’s heartbreak and yearning in just these three words.

Elizabeth and Darcy have both been married and widowed. Her husband was a brutal SOB and she of course has regrets about marrying him, while he regrets taking a wife who could never be her. They come together again from some rather dark places; as Elizabeth observes, these are not the carefree young man and woman who once shared hopes that were cruelly dashed.

Both of them have had to learn to be stronger people: Darcy to accept the physical weaknesses resulting from his injuries, and Elizabeth to simply survive (and as she does so, to thrive) first the cruelty of her husband and then his death. Seeing each other again reignites the love, the passions, and the hopes for the future that they once shared. I will not say that their meeting was a coincidence because I do not believe in coincidences: everything happens for a reason. And I cannot say that their reacquaintance reignites their dreams, because they have in fact kept their dreams of each other very much alive.

This is a story about second chances, about the strength it often takes to let go of the comfort zone we have built for ourselves and to allow ourselves to be vulnerable again, and to accept that second chance. And, of course, the joy it can ultimately bring when we do.

What I liked most: Darcy and Elizabeth telling each other about their personal fears. This was for me the most heart-rending yet hopeful scene in the book.

Plenty of misunderstandings to be overcome. This is after all Darcy and Elizabeth!

The new characters. I particularly liked Sir Robert.

The “old” characters. I am very partial to stories that give plenty of face time to Colonel Fitzwilliam.

Learning new stuff: I had never heard of St Agnes Eve before.  Or dumb cake (really?). And who knew what a footpad was?!

What I liked least: That the end of the story sort of snuck up on me! Usually I check to see how many more pages are left in a book, and altho’ I did check periodically, and while the ending was very satisfying, I was just so disappointed that it came about sooner than I expected.

In short: Another don’t-miss five-star story by Regina Jeffers. BTW, if you are fascinated by history and love learning about arcane words and expressions, I highly recommend that you follow her blog.

gold-stars-5

And now for the giveaway. I have two eBook copies of A Dance with Mr. Darcy available to those who comment on this post. The giveaway will end at midnight EDST on April 3, 2017. Good luck all!

divider-line

And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy here. desp-hearts-cover

 

# # # #

 

 

A peek under Lizzy Bennet’s muslin gown

Some weeks ago I posted a piece entitled “Getting into Mr Darcy’s pants,” about the underwear a Regency gentleman would have worn under his fashionable clothing. Rather than re-post the general overview of fashion and undergarments of the day, you might want to take a moment to re-read the original post.

regency-dressesWhen ladies of the Regency exchanged their previously-fashionable voluminous skirts for a slim, classical Greek-style high-waisted silhouette, their undergarments also altered. Wearing the previously-stylish constructed fashions that essentially re-designed the shape of a woman’s form into something resembling a bell, a lady faced two primary problems. The first was one of real estate: only so many bell-shaped ladies could fit into a given area such as a sidewalk, a shop, a sitting-room sofa, or a carriage. Secondly came the problem of maintaining modesty: one false step, or a less-than cautious entrance into or exit from a carriage, could send the rigidly-constructed frame under one’s dress — and the dress along with it — up into the air in a most revealing position.

regency-dress2The slim lines, and lightweight fabric, of a Regency Empire-style dress presented its own problems. As clothing became lighter and slimmer, ladies began to discard heavy layers of undergarments for the bare minimum required for comfort and modesty. The challenges at this time were also multi-fold: fabric folds would work themselves between a lady’s legs, often aided by a wind or even a light breeze, clingingly revealing a bit more of a lady’s form than was considered proper. Being caught in a light rain that dampened one’s attire could cause a scandalous spectacle! And again, if one was not attentive to how one was moving, or — heaven forfend! — if one tripped or took a fall, the light fabric could easily be blown or otherwise pushed away to expose a lady’s privates. (This, by the way, was the reason why gentlemen preceded ladies when walking up stairs.)

regency-1810-corset-plain
A simple corset
ladies-corset-short2-with-cups
A corset with breast supports

Even after adopting the new fashion styles, the basic lady’s undergarment remained the chemise, a simple, unfitted shift-type garment with a rounded neckline and short sleeves that reached to about the knees. It was generally made of light cotton or linen, although it might be fashioned of flannel at colder times of the year. Over the chemise was worn a corset, or stays. As with their male counterparts, ladies wore these to create a slimmer appearance. An important function of a corset was to draw in the hip area, as the slim style of dress required almost a boyish figure below the waist (much as some modern fashion styles have also demanded).

regency-petticoat-full-length
Full-length petticoat.
regency-petticoat-3-e1402359814470
Short or half-petticoat

Corsets might be simple affairs, or they might have supports for the breasts, similar to a modern brassiere. Slim hips did not exclude the preference for a femine bustline! Over this would be a petticoat, either a short petticoat from waist to ankle, which was gathered around the waist with tapes, or a full petticoat with an attached bodice. Again, they were crafted of light fabric except for winter wear. And they were mostly still homemade at this time. Depending on the style of the dress being worn, the petticoat might have a small, light hoop at the bottom to create an A-line shape rather than a straight style.

regency-ladies-drawers-2-part
Original ladies’ drawers design
regency-ladies-drawers
Evolved into this one-piece design

As to drawers … Ladies “borrowed” men’s drawers some time before 1810. Altho’ they were not in regular use at this time, by the 1810s most ladies, at least of the upper and middle classes, were wearing them. Initially these too were homemade; it wasn’t until the mid-nineteenth century that they become available commercially. Reaching from waist to knees, and fastened with tapes at both points, they were not particularly ornate, as they were not intended to be seen. At least not until Queen Charlotte decided to scandalize society by wearing them somewhat longer and sitting with her legs extended in front of her so glimpses of the embellished bottoms of the drawers could be seen as her skirts lifted slightly. Like the rest of underclothes, these were fashioned of lightweight cotton, linen, silk, stockinette, or sarsenet in summer and flannel in winter. The original ladies’ design comprised two tubes for the legs held together with tapes at the waist; these later evolved into a connected design more like the gentleman’s. Which certainly makes a lot more sense from just about every standpoint.

So perhaps the ladies of the Regency period were not so very different from modern ladies in their fashion choices. I have, however, sometimes wondered about one aspect of the effects of fashion: Was the not-uncommon loss of the mother’s life in childbirth in any way affected by the fashion of mechanically drawing in the hips as tightly as possible? Perhaps I’ll research and report on this aspect in a future posting.

Your comments, as always, are invited.

If you missed it: Part One: Getting into Mr. Darcy’s Pants

divider-line

And … if you haven’t already got your copy of Desperate Hearts, you can order a kindle copy heredesp-hearts-cover

# # # #